(Source: kirmira, via steelheartellie)

Anonymous said: I have a question about names. When a transgender person takes on a name of the gender they are now openly displaying, do they choose a name they like or is it really the name they feel they should have been born with?

Uuuuh… I don’t know? Like dude that’s different to each person. Some people change their name to a unisex or gender opposite version, some change their name completely, some don’t change it at all.

Anonymous said: Hi. I heard somewhere it's offensive to tell a transgender woman that she does her makeup better than I/most girls do. Is that true? The same source said it's a fake compliment. But what if I truly mean it? Some transgender girls are awesome at doing makeup!

It’s fine to tell a trans woman that her make up is awesome, but to quantify it or put an asterisk of “for a trans woman” at the end is what makes it a shitty back-handed compliment. Don’t compare it to yourself or “most girls” because that insinuates the same thing.

ughgodwhatever:

7 Trans Women of Color; all killed during the season that holds Pride Month. The queer community is still abuzz with the last vestiges of the season that promises parades, alcohol, and ‘a freedom to be you.’ So often, the larger LGBTQ “community,” has this idea that we’re all equally policed for being a part of this population. Without doubt, the summer of 2014 has proven that this is not the case.

…are the names of the 7 women that have fallen this season before Alejandra; and there is no protest for them. They are the silent-fallen that have fallen silent. There is an epidemic of trans female genocide; a cure to this maddening, tragic plague has yet to be seen.

Please #RememberAlejandra. If we continue to brush over the victimization of TWoC then again and again these beautiful lives will be cut short; again and again, #GirlsLikeUs will be made victims of hatred.

(via forgetpolitics)

This blog has officially hit 7,000 followers, thank you so much! You guys are absolutely wonderful. :)

Love,
@crumb

freececemcdonald:

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(via transgender)

thepeoplesrecord:

TW: Transmisogyny, murder - Aniya Parker & the epidemic of violence against trans women of colorOctober 7, 2014
Mourners in and around Los Angeles are remembering Aniya Parker, a 47-year-old transgender woman who was violently killed in East Hollywood last week.
Parker was fatally shot at 2:30 a.m. on Thursday during what police have reported as a robbery. Surveillance footage of Parker’s death has circulated widely across the Internet, showing two to four suspects surrounding her before one punches her and then shoots her in the head as she tries to flee.
Many observers aren’t buying the police’s assertion that Parker’s killing was the result of a robbery gone wrong. “This was not a robbery, in fact, they left the purse behind,” Mary Zeiser of Hollywood told ABC7 news. “This is a cold-blooded hate crime and this type of violence needs to end.”
Less than 48 hours after her death, Parker’s supporters held a memorial in her honor. Her friends and family are now trying to raise $15,000 for funeral expenses, which include transporting her body back to her home state of Arkansas. 
Parker’s death is another example of what seems like nothing short of an epidemic of violence targeting transgender women of color. She’s is the eighth transgender woman of color to be killed since the beginning of June, according to the Anti-Violence Project. She’s also the second to be killed in Los Angeles in recent months; 28-year-old Zoraida Reyes’s body was found in a parking lot behind an Orange County Dairy Queen on June 12th. Transgender women of color face disproportionately higher rates of hate violence than other members of the LGBT community, according to researchers. In fact, a 2013 report from the National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs found that LGBT people of color were nearly twice as likely to experience physical violence than their white counterparts. Transgender women made up 67 percent of anti-LGBT homicides in 2013, according to the Anti-Violence Project.
Source

thepeoplesrecord:

TW: Transmisogyny, murder - Aniya Parker & the epidemic of violence against trans women of color
October 7, 2014

Mourners in and around Los Angeles are remembering Aniya Parker, a 47-year-old transgender woman who was violently killed in East Hollywood last week.

Parker was fatally shot at 2:30 a.m. on Thursday during what police have reported as a robbery. Surveillance footage of Parker’s death has circulated widely across the Internet, showing two to four suspects surrounding her before one punches her and then shoots her in the head as she tries to flee.

Many observers aren’t buying the police’s assertion that Parker’s killing was the result of a robbery gone wrong. “This was not a robbery, in fact, they left the purse behind,” Mary Zeiser of Hollywood told ABC7 news. “This is a cold-blooded hate crime and this type of violence needs to end.”

Less than 48 hours after her death, Parker’s supporters held a memorial in her honor. Her friends and family are now trying to raise $15,000 for funeral expenses, which include transporting her body back to her home state of Arkansas. 

Parker’s death is another example of what seems like nothing short of an epidemic of violence targeting transgender women of color. She’s is the eighth transgender woman of color to be killed since the beginning of June, according to the Anti-Violence Project. She’s also the second to be killed in Los Angeles in recent months; 28-year-old Zoraida Reyes’s body was found in a parking lot behind an Orange County Dairy Queen on June 12th. Transgender women of color face disproportionately higher rates of hate violence than other members of the LGBT community, according to researchers. In fact, a 2013 report from the National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs found that LGBT people of color were nearly twice as likely to experience physical violence than their white counterparts. Transgender women made up 67 percent of anti-LGBT homicides in 2013, according to the Anti-Violence Project.

Source

(via babethesda)

freececemcdonald:

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(via season0yamiyuugis)

cinderpelt:

Last year, the CEO of Jelly Belly donated money to an organisation that was fighting to stop transgender students from gaining equal access to gender-segregated facilities. (source)

Please do not support Jelly Belly if you consider yourself an ally of transgender people. Buy an alternative…

"On January 5, 1993, a 22-year-old pre-operative transsexual woman from Seattle, Filisa Vistima, wrote in her journal, “I wish I was anatomically ‘normal’ so I could go swimming… . But no, I’m a mutant, Frankenstein’s monster.” Two months later Filisa Vistima committed suicide. What drove her to such despair was the exclusion she experienced in Seattle’s queer community, some members of which opposed Filisa’s participation because of her transsexuality — even though she identified as and lived as a bisexual woman. The Lesbian Resource Center where she served as a volunteer conducted a survey of its constituency to determine whether it should stop offering services to male-to-female transsexuals. Filisa did the data entry for tabulating the survey results; she didn’t have to imagine how people felt about her kind. The Seattle Bisexual Women’s Network announced that if it admitted transsexuals the SBWN would no longer be a women’s organization. “I’m sure,” one member said in reference to the inclusion of bisexual transsexual women, 4 6 the boys can take care of themselves.” Filisa Vistima was not a boy, and she found it impossible to take care of herself. Even in death she found no support from the community in which she claimed membership. “Why didn’t Filisa commit herself for psychiatric care?” asked a columnist in the Seattle Gay News. “Why didn’t Filisa demand her civil rights?” In this case, not only did the angry villagers hound their monster to the edge of town, they reproached her for being vulnerable to the torches. Did Filisa Vistima commit suicide, or did the queer community of Seattle kill her? (4)"

TW: Transmisogyny, Transphobia, Suicide

Source

(via longhairedpoet)

Fuck.

(via blickblocks)

i’ve been talking around this for a long time but yes the systematic desexualisation and segregation of trans women from communities of intimacy and care literally makes us die so haha

(via anagrammaton)

I brought this up recently, although I don’t remember to whom or in what context, beyond pointing out ways cis women have caused the deaths of trans women.

(via transluminescence)

(via babethesda)

I’m not here to coddle allies and pat them on the back for being a decent human being. Grow up.

Anonymous said: One of my close Friends is gender fluid, I couldn't find a specific gender fluid blog sorry. They dress often as a 'female' or 'male' depending on how they perceive themselves. I support them but they are requesting people refer to them with different names depending on how 'male' or 'female' they feel and make themselves look. Personally this is too far, I don't understand this and it's causing complications at school, with friends and between us. How do I go around expressing this?

taylorashton8:

transgender:

You should apologise to this friend for being a horrible person and never speak to them again. You’re clearly selfish and should not bother trying to be an ally if this is how you act/feel.

I think that is a a bit irrational… I would just suggest using gender neutral pronouns, as well as having a gender neutral name. If they really are adamant on they way they are doing things now, the best thing that you could do is just support them and let them know that you are doing the best you can.

Why should this persons friend have to compromise the names and pronouns they are comfortable with in order to accommodate this person? If they wanted to be called by a gender neutral name/pronouns they would have said so.

Anonymous said: One of my close Friends is gender fluid, I couldn't find a specific gender fluid blog sorry. They dress often as a 'female' or 'male' depending on how they perceive themselves. I support them but they are requesting people refer to them with different names depending on how 'male' or 'female' they feel and make themselves look. Personally this is too far, I don't understand this and it's causing complications at school, with friends and between us. How do I go around expressing this?

You should apologise to this friend for being a horrible person and never speak to them again. You’re clearly selfish and should not bother trying to be an ally if this is how you act/feel.

ciraida said: if you could share with a cis person accounts that could provide understanding of what it is like being trans, what would you show them/where would you direct them? ideally blogs that you find insightful, forums, bios, etc. thanks!

http://www.google.com/

extendedburnings:

Please reblog this and please donate if you can. Things are pretty dire. All things aside, I’d like to finish college, enter STEM, get a career, and give back to the community, things I know I can do, but not while this is in the way. 

(Source: hell-luvr, via babethesda)