(via transpride)

transpride:

Sacramento – Today, the California State Senate joined the Assembly in passing the Equal ID Act by a 22-14 vote. The bill, AB 1185, sponsored by Equality California (EQCA) and introduced by Assemblymember Ted Lieu (D-Torrance), expands legal protections for transgender people born in California. If signed by the Governor, the new law would allow qualified transgender people born in California to return to the county of their birth and obtain a court order reflecting their correct gender and an accompanying name change, if applicable. The court order is then used to obtain a corrected California birth certificate.

“All Californians deserve legal documentation that accurately reflects who they are,” EQCA Executive Director Geoff Kors said. “This measure would allow transgender people in California and beyond a greater ability to obtain accurate identification, apply for jobs and live their lives as full and equal members of society. We urge the Governor to sign the bill with haste.”

The Equal ID Act grants all transgender people born in California access to accurate birth certificates. The bill ensures that transgender people born in California can return to the county of their birth to obtain a corrected birth certificate. It also provides greater access to transgender persons living in the state and beyond, allowing them for first time to petition the court in their home counties. […]

(via myholigay)

"Transsexual, transgender, cross dresser, transvestite, tranny, t-girl, gay, fag, homo, drag queen, queer, genderqueer, and androgynous are some terms we may hear for individuals who don’t quite fit neatly into the gender category of man or woman. The media and societal understanding is usually limited to portraying male to female (mtf) transgender women as being abnormal, drag performers, entertainers and sex workers. In the last couple of years, there has been a rise in hate crimes and murders against transgender individuals in the Bay Area, including a recent murder of a transgender Latina in the Mission district of San Francisco where I reside. The Bay Area has also been the site of federal immigration raids that have targeted undocumented immigrants. The recent debates on immigration, the lack of understanding about transgender issues and murders of transgender women motivated me to do a documentary project that explores themes of gender and sexuality intersecting with being a transgender immigrant in the United States of America.  I originally envisioned the project to be about someone who was immersed in the transgender community in the city of San Francisco, but instead I encountered a 28 year old transgender woman who recently arrived from Manila, Philippines to a suburbs of the Bay Area. Nested in her aunt’s middle class home in the hills, ‘J’ countered the isolation of the suburbs by using the Internet to connect to people. While she has the financial and emotional support of her relatives here, she tries her best to live independently. She works a part time job from her relatives’ connections but is scared to look for jobs in what she calls a conservative Filipino community known to have reported undocumented immigrants for rewards from U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). She aspires to be a singer-performer-model and is learning make-up tips from her cousin. These photos attempt to show a little glimpse in the life of ‘J’ as an immigrant transgender woman negotiating gender, femininity and life in the U.S. ” by amla
"Transsexual, transgender, cross dresser, transvestite, tranny, t-girl, gay, fag, homo, drag queen, queer, genderqueer, and androgynous are some terms we may hear for individuals who don’t quite fit neatly into the gender category of man or woman. The media and societal understanding is usually limited to portraying male to female (mtf) transgender women as being abnormal, drag performers, entertainers and sex workers. In the last couple of years, there has been a rise in hate crimes and murders against transgender individuals in the Bay Area, including a recent murder of a transgender Latina in the Mission district of San Francisco where I reside. The Bay Area has also been the site of federal immigration raids that have targeted undocumented immigrants. The recent debates on immigration, the lack of understanding about transgender issues and murders of transgender women motivated me to do a documentary project that explores themes of gender and sexuality intersecting with being a transgender immigrant in the United States of America.

I originally envisioned the project to be about someone who was immersed in the transgender community in the city of San Francisco, but instead I encountered a 28 year old transgender woman who recently arrived from Manila, Philippines to a suburbs of the Bay Area. Nested in her aunt’s middle class home in the hills, ‘J’ countered the isolation of the suburbs by using the Internet to connect to people. While she has the financial and emotional support of her relatives here, she tries her best to live independently. She works a part time job from her relatives’ connections but is scared to look for jobs in what she calls a conservative Filipino community known to have reported undocumented immigrants for rewards from U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). She aspires to be a singer-performer-model and is learning make-up tips from her cousin. These photos attempt to show a little glimpse in the life of ‘J’ as an immigrant transgender woman negotiating gender, femininity and life in the U.S. ” by amla
by burma lay.
by ~LezzieLexi2QT2BSTR8
by *sammiemac
Jan Morris.
Morris served in World War II in the 9th Queen’s Royal Lancers, and later wrote for The Times. As The Times correspondent Morris scored a notable scoop in 1953 when accompanying the British expedition which was first to scale Mount Everest. Morris reported the success of Hillary and Tenzing in a coded message to the newspaper which by happy coincidence was released on the morning of Queen Elizabeth’s coronation.
Reporting from Cyprus on the Suez Crisis for The Manchester Guardian in 1956, Morris produced the first “irrefutable proof” of collusion between France and Israel in the invasion of Egyptian territory, interviewing French Air Force pilots who confirmed that they had been in action in support of Israeli forces.Morris was assigned male at birth, and before circa-1970 was known as “James Morris”. In 1949, as James, Morris married Elizabeth Tuckniss, the daughter of a tea planter. Morris and Tuckniss had five children together, including the poet and musician Twm Morys. One of their children died in infancy. As Morris documented in her memoir Conundrum, she began taking estrogen to feminise her body in 1964. In 1972, she had sex reassignment surgery in Morocco. Sex reassignment surgeon Georges Burou did the surgery, since doctors in Britain refused to allow the procedure unless Morris and Tuckniss divorced, something Morris was not prepared to do at the time. They divorced later, but remained together and have now had a civil union. On May, 14th, 2008, Morris and Tuckniss remarried each other. Morris lives mostly in Wales, where her parents were from.

Jan Morris.

Morris served in World War II in the 9th Queen’s Royal Lancers, and later wrote for The Times. As The Times correspondent Morris scored a notable scoop in 1953 when accompanying the British expedition which was first to scale Mount Everest. Morris reported the success of Hillary and Tenzing in a coded message to the newspaper which by happy coincidence was released on the morning of Queen Elizabeth’s coronation.

Reporting from Cyprus on the Suez Crisis for The Manchester Guardian in 1956, Morris produced the first “irrefutable proof” of collusion between France and Israel in the invasion of Egyptian territory, interviewing French Air Force pilots who confirmed that they had been in action in support of Israeli forces.

Morris was assigned male at birth, and before circa-1970 was known as “James Morris”. In 1949, as James, Morris married Elizabeth Tuckniss, the daughter of a tea planter. Morris and Tuckniss had five children together, including the poet and musician Twm Morys. One of their children died in infancy. As Morris documented in her memoir Conundrum, she began taking estrogen to feminise her body in 1964. In 1972, she had sex reassignment surgery in Morocco. Sex reassignment surgeon Georges Burou did the surgery, since doctors in Britain refused to allow the procedure unless Morris and Tuckniss divorced, something Morris was not prepared to do at the time. They divorced later, but remained together and have now had a civil union. On May, 14th, 2008, Morris and Tuckniss remarried each other. Morris lives mostly in Wales, where her parents were from.

Terri O’Connell (born James Terrell Hayes in Corinth, Mississippi) is a former motorsports racing champion.
Hayes won national championships in go-kart, midget cars and sprint car competitions across the country. She even rose to compete in Winston Cup for Donlavey Racing in 1990 at North Carolina Speedway.
Hayes had sexual reassignment surgery in 1992, and changed her name to Terri O’Connell. She is the author of an autobiography called Dangerous Curves, published by BookSurge.

Terri O’Connell (born James Terrell Hayes in Corinth, Mississippi) is a former motorsports racing champion.

Hayes won national championships in go-kart, midget cars and sprint car competitions across the country. She even rose to compete in Winston Cup for Donlavey Racing in 1990 at North Carolina Speedway.

Hayes had sexual reassignment surgery in 1992, and changed her name to Terri O’Connell. She is the author of an autobiography called Dangerous Curves, published by BookSurge.

The famous English painter Peter Gluck (1895-1978) was born as Hannah Glukstein to a wealthy and close-knit Jewish family. Gluck shared Chantry House in Steyning with  Edith Shackleton Heald for 34 years from 1944 until his death in 1978.

The famous English painter Peter Gluck (1895-1978) was born as Hannah Glukstein to a wealthy and close-knit Jewish family. Gluck shared Chantry House in Steyning with  Edith Shackleton Heald for 34 years from 1944 until his death in 1978.

Alonso Diaz Ramerez de Guzman, born Cataline de Erauso in 1592, was a conquistador in the early 1600’s who had permission from the Pope to dress as a man, publicized in two autobiographies and a number of biographies. He was placed in a convent as a child and deserted the convent dressed in men’s clothing made from his nun’s habit as a teenager. He sailed from Spain to Latin America, enlisted in the army and served in Mexico, Panama, Peru and Chile and rose to the rank of ensign. He returned to Spain, where, known to be anatomically female, he continued to wear male attire and had a reputation as the “nun ensign”. He died as a soldier in South America in 1645.

Alonso Diaz Ramerez de Guzman, born Cataline de Erauso in 1592, was a conquistador in the early 1600’s who had permission from the Pope to dress as a man, publicized in two autobiographies and a number of biographies. He was placed in a convent as a child and deserted the convent dressed in men’s clothing made from his nun’s habit as a teenager. He sailed from Spain to Latin America, enlisted in the army and served in Mexico, Panama, Peru and Chile and rose to the rank of ensign. He returned to Spain, where, known to be anatomically female, he continued to wear male attire and had a reputation as the “nun ensign”. He died as a soldier in South America in 1645.

James Gray, born Hannah Snell in 1722, enlisted the army in 1745. Later James joined the marines and served bravely in India. Upon returning to England, he was discovered to be anatomically female and took up acting in “breeches” (male) roles in the theatre. He petitioned for and was awarded a military pension, continued to dress as a man, opened a pub and put up a sign which read, “The Widow in Masquerade or the Female Warrior.”

James Gray, born Hannah Snell in 1722, enlisted the army in 1745. Later James joined the marines and served bravely in India. Upon returning to England, he was discovered to be anatomically female and took up acting in “breeches” (male) roles in the theatre. He petitioned for and was awarded a military pension, continued to dress as a man, opened a pub and put up a sign which read, “The Widow in Masquerade or the Female Warrior.”

John M. (Marguerite) Radclyffe Hall wrote the first novel about trans men, called “inverts,” and referred to himself as an “invert.” He was with his partner Una Troubridge over 30 years. The character in the novel  The Well of Loneliness, Stephen Gordon, used a male name for himself and described his body in the book as trans. The book was banned, but subsequently became a classic.

John M. (Marguerite) Radclyffe Hall wrote the first novel about trans men, called “inverts,” and referred to himself as an “invert.” He was with his partner Una Troubridge over 30 years. The character in the novel The Well of Loneliness, Stephen Gordon, used a male name for himself and described his body in the book as trans. The book was banned, but subsequently became a classic.